Trombone and Violin(s), Pre-1800

annunziata genova 1 cropped

Early Baroque angel-musicians (Basilica della Santissima Annunziata del Vastato, Genoa, ca. 1640).

TROMBONE AND VIOLIN(S)

Note: Many pieces in this category list violin as interchangeable with cornett.

1609—Italy: Ercole Porta calls for violin and trombone in his 2-part Sinfonia (Winkler 298).

1613—Imola, Italy: Giulio Belli writes Concerti ecclesiastici a due et a tre voci, which calls for trombone. Specifically, Canzona No. 16 is a 2-part work that specifies trombone, cornett (or violin), and continuo, and Canzona No. 29 is a 3-part work calling for 2 cornetts (or violins), trombone, and continuo (Collver 43).

1613—Italy: Ercole Porta’s Canzona 34, a 3-part work, calls for 2 cornetts or violins and one trombone (Winkler 299).

1615—Arcangelo Borsaro writes for 2 cornettos (or violins), trombone, and organ in his La Matusaleme a tre from Odarati fiori (Collver 45).

1618—Venice, Italy: Bastiano Miseroca’s I pietosi affetti includes Canzon a 3, which calls for 2 cornetts or violins, trombone, and basso continuo (Collver 62).

1620—Venice, Italy: Giovanni Battista Riccio calls for trombone in a collection of canzoni, Il terzo libro delle divine lodi musicali (Selfridge-Field, Instrumentation). Specific examples include Canzon La Fineta, a 2-part work for trombone and violin; Canzon La Savoldi, a 2-part work for trombone and violin; Canzon La Picchi, a 2-part work for trombone and violin; Canzon La Rubina, a 3-part work for 2 violins or cornetts and trombone, and Canzon La Moceniga, a 3-part work for 2 violins and 2 trombones (Winkler 300; Collver 65).

1620—Italy: Ercole Porta scores for duo of violin and trombone in L’Animosa, from the composer’s collection, Sacro convito.

1620—Italy: Ercole Porta calls for 2 violins and 3 trombones in 3 separate pieces: Consolamini, Salve Mater pia, and Mass. The pieces come from the composer’s collection, Sacro convito.

1617—Biagio Marini’s Affetti musicali includes La Giustiniana, which is scored for 2 violins or cornetts, trombone, and continuo; La Foscarina, which is scored for 2 violins or cornetts, trombone, and continuo; La Hiacintina, which is scored for violin or cornett, trombone, and continuo; and La Marina, which is scored for violin or cornett, 2 trombones, and continuo (Collver 59).

1621—Dario Castello composes numerous chamber compositions with parts for 1 or 2 trombones, particularly in his Quinta Sonata from Book I. In these works, the trombone is the only instrument specifically named (Wigness 9). Referring to the virtuosic technical demands of the trombone parts in these sonatas, the second edition of Book 1 includes the following note: “He says, in short, that they are the consequence of the new style everyone is observing and hopes that the players will not give up on the first try” (Wigness 10).

1621—Stefano Bernardi’s 7 Canzonas a 3 from Madrigaletti a due et a tre voci specify the following for the bottom musical line: theorbo or bassoon or trombone. The other 2 voices are to be played by either 2 cornetts or 2 violins (Collver 43).

1621—At the Bavarian court in Munich, cornettist and trombonist Giulio Martino Cesare writes a collection of 28 instrumental and vocal works called Musicali Melodie. It includes “La Costanza,” for 2 cornetts (or violins) and trombone, “La Famosa,” for 2 cornetts (or violins) and trombone, and “La Gioia,” for 2 cornetts (or violins) and trombone (Whitwell Catalog Baroque 122; Collver 47).

1622—Giacinto Bondioli (1596-1636) includes 7 canzoni in his collection, Soavi fiori colti, that call for cornetto (or violin), trombone (or bassoon), and organ (Collver 44).

1622—Venice, Italy: By this date, P.A. Mariani writes Canzon Per il Deo Gratias, a 2-part work for violin and trombone (Winkler 300).

1625—Venice, Italy: Giovanni Picchi calls for trombone frequently in his collection of sonatas and canzoni titled Canzoni da sonar con ogni sorte d’istromenti. Specifically, Canzon Terza is scored for violin and trombone, Sonata Sesta is scored for violin and trombone, Canzon Settima is scored for 2 violins and trombone, Canzon Ottavais scored for 2 violins and trombone, Canzon Decima is scored for 2 flutes and 2 trombones, Canzon Undecima is scored for 2 cornetts and 2 trombones, Canzon Duodecima is scored for 2 violins and 2 trombones, Canzon Decima Terza is scored for 2 cornetts and 2 trombones, Canzon Decima Quarta is scored for 2 violins or cornetts and 4 trombones, Canzon Decima Quinta is scored for 2 violins and 4 trombones, and Sonata Decima Sesta is scored for 2 violins, 2 flutes, trombone, and bassoon (Winkler 301; Selfridge-Field, Instrumentation; Picchi, Canzoni da sonar; Collver 64).

1626/1641—Venice, Italy: Giovanni Rovetta publishes Salmi concertati a cinque et sei voci, which includes Canzon seconda a 3 for 2 violins (or cornetts), trombone, and continuo (Collver 67).

1628—Italy: Ottavio Maria Grandi calls for trombone in Sonata Decima Nona, a 5-voice work for violin and 4 trombones, and Sonata Vigesima, a 6-voice work for 3 violins and 3 trombones (Winkler 301).

1629—Palermo, Italy: Bartolomeo Mont’Albano specifies trombone in a collection of his works. Specifically both Sinfonia Settima Castelletti and Sinfonia Octava Fiumicello are 3-part works scored for 2 violins and trombone (Winkler 302; Selfridge-Field, Instrumentation).

1629—Nuremberg, Germany: Numerous works from Biagio Marini’s instrumental collection, Sonate, sinfonie, canzoni, passemezzi…, specify trombone, including Canzone quarta a 4 (2 violins or cornetts, 2 trombones ad lib, basso continuo), Canzon octava (2 violins, 4 trombones), Canzone decima a 6 (2 violins or cornetts, 4 violas or trombones, basso continuo), and Sonata per l’Organo (violin or cornett, trombone ad lib, organ) (Collver 60; Selfridge-Field, Instrumentation; Winkler 301). For additional works from the same collection, see “Trombone Duets,” Trombone Quartets,” and “Trombone with Various Other Ensembles.”

1636—Giovanni Battista Buonamente uses trombones prominently in his collection, Sonate et canzoni a due, tre, quattro, cinque et a sei voci. Highlights include Canzon a 5 for 2 cornetts or violins, 3 trombones, and continuo; Sonata a 5 for violin, cornett, 3 trombones, and continuo; Sonata a 6 for violin, cornett, 3 trombones, theorbo, and continuo; and Sonata a 6 for 2 cornetts or violins, 4 trombones, and continuo (Collver 46). (Royal College of Music sackbut rep list).

1638—Orvieto, Italy: Molli calls for violino, liuto, and trombone in a collection of his works (Selfridge-Field, Instrumentation). In addition, he scores for 2 violins and trombone in Sinfonia La Liera and Sinfonia La Viviana, and he scores for 3 violins and trombone in Sinfonia L’Anguillona and Sinfonia La Ludovisia (Winkler 302).

1642—Modena, Italy: Marco Uccellini scores for trombone and violin in his 2-part Sonata Seconda La Bucefalsca (Winkler 303; Selfridge-Field, Instrumentation).

c. 1650—Antonio Bertali writes 6 Sonate a 6, which call for “2 violini o cornetti e 3 viole o tromboni col basso per l’organo” (Bertali, 13 sonate manoscritte).

c. 1650—Biagio Marini writes Sonata Duodecima a 2, Op. 8, No. 12, for trombone, violin, and continuo. (Royal College of Music sackbut rep list). Performance edition available (Kagarice Brass Ed).

1660—Modena, Italy: Marco Uccellini scores for trombone and violin in Sonata Decima Terza (Winkler 304; Selfridge-Field, Instrumentation).

1662—Germany: Andreas Oswald (also Uswalt or Ußwaldt) (1634-1665) writes numerous works that are included in the collection, Partiturbuch Ludwig. Among them is Sonata a 2 in a minor for violin, trombone or viol, and continuo.

1662—Germany: Johann Michael Nicolai’s Sonata a 2 in G for violin, trombone, and continuo is included in the Partiturbuch Ludwig.

c. 1730—Johann Joseph Fux, Sonata à 3 (E 68) for trombone, 2 violins, and basso continuo. Performance edition available (Ensemble Pub).